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Gabrielle, George F. (KSC-ISC-4011)[URS Federal Technical Services, Inc.] george.f.gabrielle at nasa.gov
Wed Oct 15 06:22:48 CDT 2014


Good morning all,
 I hope you are having a good week and for those of you who were off Monday, I'm sure you enjoyed your long weekend... I visited two schools yesterday Mabry & Burney Elem, this was my second trip to Burney in two weeks because when I was there we had technical problems and I felt like I owed the kids a better show, even though the teachers said the kids enjoyed it...it was fun to see them again. I always want to thank the teachers who do so much and for their support as I know they have to prepare for visitors...so would like to thank Tina at Burney and Jessica at Mabry...I was supposed to be at Mabry at 7:15 but got stuck in traffic and road construction so didn't get there until 8...Jessica had to change everything and somehow managed to get it all in...it turned out very well and am so thankful for the support I get at the schools. But this morning when I got to work I had an email from Lee Elem confirming my visit for yesterday as well...I never did see it as I had left work on Monday before it was received...and I feel terrible that the kids were expecting me and I didn't show...and I won't have another chance to go back until the end of this month....I hope you can share a little of the space walk with the kids...it will give them an idea of what it is like to do things in space.... LIVE: Spacewalk Coverage, NASA TV<http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html>  wishing you all a very happy day...we have to always remember to do our best, enjoy everything we do, live in the present, be appreciative of the good in our lives, smile & have fun.... Gabe
<http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html>
Second Expedition 41 Spacewalk Today
 <http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html>
The Expedition 41 crew of the International Space Station geared up Tuesday for a pair of spacewalks. Two NASA astronauts wrapped up preparations to head outside today and replace a power regulator. Flight Engineers Reid Wiseman and Barry Wilmore will work outside the space station during a 6 ½-hour spacewalk set to begin around 8:20 a.m. EDT.
LIVE: Spacewalk Coverage, NASA TV<http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html>

Astronaut Reid Wiseman on the First Spacewalk of Expedition 41<http://www.nasa.gov/content/astronaut-reid-wiseman-on-the-first-spacewalk-of-expedition-41>


On Oct. 7, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (pictured here) and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst completed the first of three spacewalks for the Expedition 41 crew aboard the International Space Station. The spacewalkers worked outside the space station's Quest airlock for 6 hours and 13 minutes, relocating a failed cooling pump to external stowage and installing gear that provides back up power to external robotics equipment. Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA operated the Canadian robotic arm, maneuvered Gerst during the course of the spacewalk and served as the spacewalk coordinator.
A second U.S. spacewalk is set for Oct. 15. Wilmore will don a U.S. spacesuit and follow Wiseman outside the Quest airlock for a 6-1/2 hour excursion. Gerst will serve as the spacewalk choreographer. The goal of the excursion is to replace a failed voltage regulator component on the starboard truss of the station. They will also move external camera equipment in advance of a major reconfiguration of station modules next year for the arrival of new docking adapters for commercial crew vehicles.

<http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/october/nasa-mission-provides-its-first-look-at-martian-upper-atmosphere/index.html>
MAVEN's First Look at Martian Upper Atmosphere
 <http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/october/nasa-mission-provides-its-first-look-at-martian-upper-atmosphere/index.html>
NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft has provided scientists their first look at a storm of energetic solar particles at Mars, produced unprecedented ultraviolet images of the tenuous oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon coronas surrounding the Red Planet, and yielded a comprehensive map of highly-variable ozone in the atmosphere underlying the coronas.
<http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/rosetta-selflessly-beams-back-comet-selfie/index.html>
Rosetta Selflessly Beams Back Comet Selfie
 <http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/rosetta-selflessly-beams-back-comet-selfie/index.html>
A camera aboard the European Space Agency's Philae lander snapped this "selfie" of one of the Rosetta spacecraft's 52-foot-long (16-meter) solar arrays, with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko hovering in the background some 10 miles (16 kilometers) away. The image, taken by the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA), was taken on Oct. 7. Philae, which is connected to the Rosetta orbiter at this time, will make its descent to the surface of the comet on Nov. 12.<http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/1934-had-worst-drought-of-last-thousand-years/index.html>

<http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/skyscience/>
Help NASA Do #SkyScience For Earth Science Week
 <http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/skyscience/>
In celebration of Earth Science Week, Oct. 12 -18, NASA invites you to look up at the sky and help scientists who study Earth's clouds by participating in #SkyScience. Clouds cover about half of the planet at any one time, ranging from high, wispy cirrus to dark, rumbling thunderheads. By participating in #SkyScience you will help NASA learn more about the types of clouds where you live, work and play, and help all of us celebrate the beauty of Earth's atmosphere, and the science behind it.



Stuck on the Rings
<http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/cassini/pia18284>


Like a drop of dew hanging on a leaf, Tethys appears to be stuck to the A and F rings from this perspective.
Tethys (660 miles, or 1,062 kilometers across), like the ring particles, is composed primarily of ice. The gap in the A ring through which Tethys is visible is the Keeler gap, which is kept clear by the small moon Daphnis (not visible here).
This view looks toward the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Tethys. North on Tethys is up and rotated 43 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 14, 2014.
The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.1 million miles (1.8 million kilometers) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 22 degrees. Image scale is 7 miles (11 kilometers) per pixel.
The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.
For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage


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